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. >> good evening. i'm the director of the yale law library and i'm here to welcome you to the library booktalk sister i want to thank the founders society for cosponsoring tonight's talk. tonight's program features logan beirne who is the author of a new book on america's first chief executive entitled "blood of tyrants: george washington and the forging of the presidency." this is very much a yale law school block. it began as a paper while logan was a law school student. the paper was written -- after graduation from law school in 2008 and working two years in a law firm, logan returned to yale law school in 2010 as a scholar and began turning the paper into the book that we feature tonight. appropriate laid we have the professor with those to comment on the book. professor is a highly distinguished member of the yale law school factoid. is the author of numerous books, monographs and articles, and several of his books have been featured in previous book club series sponsored by our library. according to a recently published study by my colleague, fred sugar, professor eskridge is
to the logs and find out? to because they gather one. @booktv gather every one of the law books, all the organ's locks and everything to do with these are plants that night get shipped over to the command ship where there are meeting to cover up the story . they did away with it. that's why you haven't. and, in fact, to put the fear of god and the people who kept copies because they felt guilty, one of the chiefs actually kept a copy of what the fire that night, whenever. he would not turn it over because he still is so afraid of what might happen to him if he turns it over and if i were to get your someone were to get in and talk about it. as long as you d'tell anybody who they are taught all of this led turns out he was never notified. i went to see him. he was a reservist and. he lived in virginia. i drove out there to see him and talk to him and show them what i had. he slammed his fist down on the table and says, i have sas teams here and here and here. we put people in here. the helicopter ser. you know, so they could get to these guys of the went down because they expected a lot more of
issued a proclamation which declared in effect marshall law for the county of princes and, required all of this history wear red ribbons to show their loyalty for the mother company. the first house of worship actually was the old courthouse building, but that was acquired in the 1820s, and it served for almost 100 years a. across the street from us is a church which was organized in 1843, portion of the old sanctuary survived a 1940s fire, and, therefore, it is the oldest house of worship here in this area. the city of virginia beach as we noted consist of 310 square miles until relatively recently, very rural, in the beginning of the wicked are only 19,000 people in all of the modern city of 440,000. and so the historic buildings that we have going back to hundred, 250, 300 years are really very scattered. today, virginia beach is known to many people because of the resort and the oceanfront. that was impossible really in the 1880s when the rail line was constructed from norfolk to the oceanfront. there are several buildings at the oceanfront which reflect the early years of the virgi
rush. one came from massachusetts, from harvard and yale law school. so was an odd mix. one was a politician, businessman, double dealer, self-promoter, who became the first superintendent of yellowstone national park. the sent one, whose father had followed the gold rush, was a soldier, a humble cavalry lieutenant who is also a self-taught scientist, brilliant man, phenomenal writer, who wrote the first great account of the exploration of yellow stone in 1870 that was haled at the time by the leading scientist office the day as the greates writings sip lewis and clark, and the third was the harvard and yale law school bookish hype ocon dry yack scholar, who became like men in the west, driven by fear, for a of the others he walked from independence, iowa to the montana gold rush. acted the politician and future superintendent, and like a lot of white men who settled there, he became an exterminationist. i think about the conversation in the earlier panel about the problem for historians out presentism. how you impose the moral assumptions and values of the present on the re
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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